Book Giveaway Winners!

Congratulations to Luke B. Campbell!

Luke is the grand prize winner of our giveaway and will receive copies of 5 Baker Academic titles – including J.R. Daniel Kirk’s Jesus Have I Loved, but Paul?

Our five runner-up winners are Dieter Thom, Dave Reynolds, Brook Fonceca, Leslie Keeney, and C. C. Almon! They will each receive a copy of Jesus Have I Loved, but Paul?

Thank you to all of you that entered and who followed the blog tour.

In case you are itching for another tour, our sister division Brazos Press has a blog tour for Peter Enns’ new book The Evolution of Adam: What the Bible Does and Doesn’t Say about Human Origins next week (Jan. 30 – Feb. 3).

Check out the blog tour announcement here.

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Chapter 10: Joel Willitts

Joel Willitts has posted on the tenth, and final, chapter of Jesus Have I Loved, but Paul? – “Living Interpretations”

He writes:

If I have read Daniel rightly, I am more than sympathetic to his perspective on the relationship between Jesus and Paul. And I am particularly grateful for his stress on the story of Israel within which both Jesus and Paul lived, moved and breathed. I affirm, also, his impulse to see the outcome of the story, or the effects of the story, as utmost important. Jesus lived, died and rose again to enact a Kingdom and new creation. Paul sought though a ministry patterned on Jesus’ death and resurrection to proclaim the good news of the Kingdom to the gentiles for the purpose of bringing about the obedience of faith among them (Rom 1:5; 16:26).

Read the entire post here.

Dr. Joel Willitts is Associate Professor in Biblical and Theological Studies at North Park University and College Pastor at Christ Community Church.

Joel currently blogs at “Euangelion“.

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Chapter 9: Tony Jones

Tony Jones has posted his response to Kirk’s chapter “Homosexuality under the Reign of Christ”.

Tony begins by writing:

OK, I’m going to be a little tough on my friend, Daniel Kirk, in this post. Daniel is, admittedly, to my hermeneutical right. He’s a New Testament prof at my alma mater, Fuller Seminary, and I have a great deal of respect for him. But the chapter in his new book on homosexuality, while more generous than many evangelicals, falls short. It does so because it recapitulates the familiar meme, Love the Sinner, Hate the Sin.

Read the entire post here.

Dr. Tony Jones is an adjunct professor, sought-after speaker, and author of many books – including The Church Is Flat: The Relational Ecclesiology of the Emerging Church Movement (2011).

He currently blogs at “Theoblogy”

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Chapter 9: Mason Slater

Mason Slater has posted his take on chapter 9 from Jesus Have I Loved, but Paul?  - “Homosexuality under the Reign of Christ”

He writes:

So what does it look like to love our homosexual neighbor as ourselves? The last few pages of the chapter wrestle with that admittedly complex question. I won’t delve into specifics at the moment, but the general thrust is this – is it loving the GLBT community as we would want to be loved if we deny them rights that we would never want others to deny to us?

We’ve failed miserably in our treatment this group of people, but the Christian narrative of love and self sacrifice might just point a way forward.

Read the entire post here.

Mason Slater is a MA student at Grand Rapids Theological Seminary, a freelance writer/blogger, and a publishing consultant.

He currently blogs at “New Ways Forward”

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Chapter 8: Brian LePort

Brian LePort has posted on chapter eight of Jesus Have I Loved, but Paul? - “Sex in the Plot of God’s Stories”.

He writes:

Kirk proposes that Jesus and Paul understand sexuality in much the same way through the same biblical framework. I agree. Jesus and Paul were both conservative about sexuality (Paul went as far as to advocate celibacy as a superior state, see pp. 168-169). They understood some expressions as holy and some as sinful. Do we as the church align with them?

Read the entire post here.

Brian LePort is a ThM student at Western Seminary where he also received a MA in Biblical and Theological Studies.

Brian currently blogs at “Near Emmaus“.

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Chapter 7: John Byron

John Byron has posted his take on Chapter 7 (“Liberty and Justice for All?”) from Jesus Have I Loved, but Paul?

He writes:

I was asked to review chapter seven, Liberty and Justice for All? Overall  I have enjoyed Kirk’s approach to Paul as he seeks to demonstrate the connections between the messages of Jesus and Paul via the story of Israel. I think he provides a fresh, accessible approach to Paul that will help many.

Read the entire post here.

Dr. John Byron is Associate Professor of New Testament at Ashland Theological Seminary.

He currently blogs at “The Biblical World”

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Chapter 6: Andrew Perriman

Andrew Perriman has posted his blog entry on “Women in the Story of God” from Jesus Have I Loved, but Paul?

He writes:

There is a limit to what can be achieved in a single chapter. A number of important exegetical issues are not touched on—I would highlight the metaphor of “headship”, which I don’t think denotes one who has authority over another in Hellenistic Greek, and the curious verb authenteō in 1 Timothy 2:12, which certainly does not mean “to have authority over”; and there is no discussion of 1 Corinthians 14:34-35. So the reader should not expect an exhaustive treatment of this difficult subject.

But that is not the purpose of the book. What Kirk sets out to do is to show that a “storied theology” of the New Testament is both coherent and practical—that the shift away from the traditional categories of Protestant theology does not leave us stranded up a narrative creek without an ethical paddle. This is where the real strength of the book is to be found.

Read the entire post here.

Andrew Perriman is the author of several books, including Speaking of Women: Interpreting Paul (IVP, 1998) and The Future of the People of God: Reading Romans Before and After Western Christendom (Wipf & Stock, 2010).

He currently blogs at postost.net.

 

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